Our Year 1 Courses list:

This course prepares students for a career in dentistry by teaching them fundamental knowledge about dentistry, including the history and future of dentistry, health communication, dental education, and an introduction to dental specialties. The course also introduces the students to dental public health and provides the necessary information about disease prevention, health promotion, the burden of oral diseases on the population with their required oral health workforce, and dental expenditures.

The D1 in Head and Neck Anatomy course in human anatomy is devoted to the study of the structure and function of the head, neck, brain, and thorax.  It includes the study of the organs and muscles with their relationships, arterial supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and innervation.  An effort is made to correlate anatomy with other courses in the basic and clinical sciences of the dental curriculum with an emphasis on clinical relevance.

This course in Cell and Molecular Biology has the following primary objectives: the first objective is to prepare the students for the other biomedical science courses in the curriculum and places an emphasis on molecular and human genetics. The second objective of the course is the development of an understanding of how the molecular biological tools could be translated into understanding disease processes and ultimately for clinical use.

This course deals with didactic and practical to demonstrate the oral histology and embryology concepts. In addition, the students will become versed with interconnection between macroscopic and microscopic structures to facilitate visualization of oral structures. This course mainly aims to understand the development and biology of oral tissues, which could further bring better clinical outcomes by applying tissue engineering concepts, gene therapy, and reconstructing oral tissues that could be established in the near future.

This course provides students with the fundamental principles of microbiology and immunology to understand the mechanisms of infectious disease and the means by which the host protects itself against them. In addition, it reviews the fundamental principles to bridge basic biology of infectious diseases viewed from the dentist office. The majority of the sessions will be presented in traditional lecture format, with some practical sessions.

This course introduces dental students to the principles of scientific evidence. The didactic component of this course is designed to provide students with the basic information about the research designs in dentistry and their statistical analyses. It also provides knowledge and skills on critical appraisal of literature embracing evidence based approach, technical writing of scientific paper and the use of endnote software for bibliography.
The practical part of this course introduces dental students to the approach of conducting mini research projects as a research team. By the end of this project, each team will have sufficient knowledge and skills in finding research hypothesis, formulating questionnaires, collecting and analyzing data and presenting their research finding by both oral    presentations as well as writing their research paper.

This course is designed to provide the dentistry student with fundamental knowledge relating to the actions and effects of drugs on man. While the emphasis of the course is on basic pharmacology rather than applied therapeutics, appropriate correlative clinical material must necessarily be included at times in order to elucidate essential pharmacologic concepts. Effort is made to integrate the pharmacology instruction with considerations of biochemistry and physiology with which the student is expected to be already familiar. The lectures emphasize drug classes and prototypes rather than repetitive details about individual drugs. Attention is focused on drug mechanism(s) of action, pharmacodynamics, toxic effects and important interactions with other drugs.

Dental Biomaterials I, DEMT 311 The course is designed to enhance the students’ understanding of the Basic science and properties of dental biomaterials. It aims to help the students to reason the selection of a dental material for laboratory and clinical use. Furthermore, it will emphasize the composition, properties and the laboratory/clinical manipulation of the dental biomaterials.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the principles of biochemistry and molecular biology. Nutritional guidelines for optimum human health at all stages of life, including dietary reference intakes and discuss energy requirements and metabolism, and acceptable macronutrient distribution range and the imbalance leading to undernutrition, obesity, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and their dietary management are discussed. Other topics include the essential chemical structure, biochemistry, and metabolic functions of the macro-and micro-nutrients as well as some important non-nutrient components of foods, regulation of gene expression by specific nutrients, drug-nutrient interaction, nutritional immunology, a brief review of the impact of nutrition on oral health and the methods of nutritional status assessment.

The course reviews the pathophysiology of the relevant systemic conditions the students might encounter in dental practice using different teaching methods, including lectures, case studies, and flipped classes.

The Applied Physiology & Neuroscience course includes normal biological function, neuronal activity and functions ranging from molecular events to neuronal circuitry, neurophysiology and neuroscience. The activities of the nervous system presented include: nociception, discriminative, touch and proprioception, special senses, somatic motor control and higher cortical functions. Clinical correlations and therapies are discussed to illustrate the importance of understanding the basis of these functions of the nervous system. This course includes an in-depth coverage of the physiology and histology of the following five major organ-systems: Gastrointestinal, Cardiovascular, Renal, Respiratory, and Endocrine. In this course you will learn about the different components of the pain pathways and the body’s mechanisms which are dependent on the tissue of origin. You will learn about the pain originating from specific structures in the body with an emphasis on pain of craniofacial origin which is essential for further comprehension of appropriate treatment of pain.

The D1 year course in Periodontics I is an introduction to periodontology and is geared towards first year dental students. Students are presented with an introduction to the anatomy, histology and embryology of the healthy periodontium as well as an overview of the clinical discipline of Periodontics. Laboratory simulation and preclinical exercises are critical to developing basic skills needed to document patients’ periodontal status while stressing the importance of prevention and maintenance. The students will acquire basic clinical skills in patient examination, data collection, OHI, scaling and root planing, and also learn about instrument design. The didactic and simulation exercises form a critical information foundation for future courses in periodontology and are designed to prepare students to begin supervised periodontal recall and maintenance visits on patients.

Oral Radiology I is a pre-clinical course. It has didactic and practical sessions presented yearly course in the first year (D1) of DMD program (professional program).
Radiographs play an important role in the evaluation and diagnosis of the diseases affecting oral and maxillofacial region.  To make the best use of radiographic images in the practice of dentistry, it is important to understand the basic principles of imaging. In order to achieve this objective, the course has been designed to provide fundamental knowledge of the physics of ionizing radiation, production of x-rays and safe operation of dental x-ray machines. It also covers the mechanisms by which radiation interacts with living systems, principles of radiation safety and infection control protocols to be followed in the oral radiology clinics.
In the later part of the course, topics on different techniques of intraoral and extraoral radiography, principles underlying the panoramic and advanced imaging modalities are covered. Recognition of normal anatomic structures, variations of normal anatomy, errors and artefacts on intraoral and extraoral radiographic images is emphasized, which forms the basis for interpretation of the radiographs.

The D1 Year Course in Dental Anatomy and Operative Dentistry, RSTO 311 is the first preclinical course in restorative dentistry. It is designed for the beginning student. The course is constructed to present basic, fundamental information that will enable the learner to obtain a core of knowledge and develop the skills necessary to perform operative dentistry. This course provides students with instructions to develop fundamental knowledge and principles used to develop and recognize healthy dentition and occlusal function.  Using wax, students will restore the coronal surfaces of different plaster teeth models in a dentoform in centric occlusion by wax carving techniques. This is designated to reinforce the theoretical knowledge gained in the lectures, as well as contribute towards the development of manual dexterity, a skill which is essential in the practice of dentistry. Identification of natural teeth specimens form a significant part of the practical component of the course. In addition, this course explores oral histology by introducing the students to the physical properties of enamel, enamel rods, and histology of enamel, dentin and the dentin-enamel junction with special emphasis on the clinical significance of histology. A sound foundation in these principles and procedures will then enable one to perform subsequent complex restorative procedures. The functional applications of Dental Anatomy and Operative Dentistry embrace all phases of clinical dentistry. It is therefore essential that you have a thorough understanding of the basic concepts which will be directly applied to the study and practice of dentistry. In subsequent courses you will apply it to Fixed Partial Prosthodontics, Removable Prosthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontics, Endodontics and Oral Surgery.
Success in this course will demand a mastery of the didactic phase, waxing procedures and simulation exercises. The laboratory format is largely self-instructional, but faculty members are always present to provide advice, assistance and direction.  Independence and self-evaluation are encouraged, but proper guidance with your work is essential.
After studying about the anatomy of the dentition, the student learns to draw and wax-up different teeth. After that, the course will cover dental caries and dental instrumentation, and the student will then learn the operating positions and the correct use of indirect vision. The course then proceeds to cavity preparation and the restoration of teeth with direct restorative materials.
Throughout these exercises, the student must remain conscious of the fact that patient treatment is only a short time away from these simulation exercises. Typodont teeth are both biologically and physiologically different from clinically vital teeth. However, they must be treated with the same respect and consideration as if they were part of a real patient.

Our Year 2 Courses list:

The course consists of didactic sessions. The initial sessions focus primarily on the basic biology, modes of transmission of infectious diseases. This is followed by topics on infectious diseases involving different systems of the body including oral and maxillofacial region focusing mainly on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention.

Dental Biomaterials II, DEMT 412 course is a continuation of the Dental Biomaterial I course. The course is designed to enhance the students’ understanding of the properties of dental biomaterials. It aims to help the students to reason the selection of a dental material for laboratory and clinical use. Furthermore, it will emphasize the composition, properties and the laboratory/clinical manipulation of the dental biomaterials.

This D2 course is an introduction to effective professional communication and behavior management in dental practice.  Students learn to identify and address the behavioral issues encountered in dentistry, ranging from those affecting the individual patients (e.g., strategies for reducing anxiety in nervous and phobic patients), to broader concerns for the entire population (e.g. motivating the population as a whole to adopt healthier diet and hygiene practices). It also provides fundamentals into psychosocial care of pediatric as well as geriatric patients in a dental setting.

The D2 year-course in Removable Prosthodontics (PROS 411) is designed to build upon the knowledge acquired during the first year of the D.M.D. curriculum and to demonstrate and integrate this foundation as basics for the pre-clinical aspects in removable prosthodontics. Throughout this course, the D2 student must achieve a fundamental knowledge of complete denture and removable partial denture fabrication to promote five basic objectives: Preservation of tissue, restoration of esthetics, stability of prostheses, support of prostheses, and retention of prostheses.
Laboratory instruction will occur in the Simulation and Pre-Clinical labs under the supervision of the Prosthodontic faculty members. Laboratory emphasis shall be upon the clinical steps and laboratory techniques used to fabricate complete dentures as well as the concept design of removable partial dentuers. Knowledge of the techniques, materials and desired outcomes of both complete and removable partial dentures shall be obtained.

The D2 course in Oral Diagnosis Treatment Planning is comprised of didactic clinical instruction and experience in comprehensive treatment planning of patients in the clinic and on simulated patients.

The D2 year-course in Periodontics II is designed to build upon the knowledge acquired during the first (D1) year of the curriculum and to demonstrate and integrate this foundation with respect to patient management. This course will focus on the review of the pathogenesis of the periodontal disease and its connection with systemic health and non-surgical treatment including mechanical instrumentation, chemotherapeutics and maintenance of the treated patients. Knowledge of the data collection methods, instrumentation techniques, treatment methods indications and desired outcomes of periodontal non-surgical procedures shall be obtained.

The D2 Introduction to Comprehensive Dental Care course in the third term is designed to introduce dental students to the concept of comprehensive patient care and treating patients. This course includes clinical examination, diagnosis, decision-making and treatment planning of comprehensive cases. In addition, it enable students to utilize their acquired knowledge and skills learned in practical sessions of Restorative Dentistry and Periodontics into performing different periodontal treatments, preventive, and simple restorative procedures. During clinical sessions, students will work in pairs assisting each other, and will be attached to other students of D3 and D4 levels at the Comprehensive Dental Care clinics as well.

The subject matter includes aspects of general and oral pathology, general, internal and oral medicine, oral diagnosis and radiology. While the format of this course resembles basic sciences that was experienced, this is, in fact, a clinically oriented course. The knowledge and skills developed in this course will be required in the clinic to manage satisfactorily the patients assigned to you. For this reason, certain portions of the course are prerequisites for being assigned clinic patients.

The D2 year-course in Operative Dentistry and Cariology, RSTO 412 is designed for beginner dental students. It has been constructed to achieve different primary objectives. Students receive didactic instruction in single tooth restorations. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making and treatment planning on single tooth restorations and the placement of these restorative materials in simulated clinical enviroment. Esthetics and esthetic bonding is also part of this course. In addition, this course will teach the students the dental caries mechanism, its possible causes, and methods for its prevention. It presents many of the biological aspects of dental caries including salivary flow, diet and nutrition and their effects on the caries process. The role of fluoride will be emphasized in remineralization of the initial carious lesion and in the reduction of dental caries. A sound foundation of knowledge and comprehension of Cariology will help students to design and perform caries prevention measure, diet counseling and subsequently provide complex restorative procedures for their patients whenever needed.
Students are expected to have thorough understanding of the basic concepts  of dental anatomy, oral histology and occlusion and be able to apply these concepts in their practical course sessions and expand their knowledge further during this course.
The students will gain knowledge about dental caries. They will be able to identify all dental instruments used to perform operative dentistry in their practical sessions. They will subsequently learn to adopt the correct operating positions and light direction. They will learn to work using indirect vision. The course proceeds to teach students the preparation different carious cavities and the restoration of these cavities using composites or glass ionomer materials.
The students are required to pass successfully the didactic phase and simulation tasks. The departmental staff will supervise the work of students and will guide them to perform their tasks correctly. However, students will be encouraged to work independently and evaluate their own work.
During their exercises, students must comprehend that treating patients is only a short time away from these simulation exercises. They should beware that artificial teeth are biologically and physiologically different from vital teeth. Thus, typodont teeth must be treated as if they were vital teeth and operative procedures must mimic those that are going to be performed in real patient dentition.

This is a D2 level course entitled principles of oral surgery and dental anesthesiology. This course is intended to cover the basic techniques of local anesthesia administration in addition to pain & anxiety control techniques. Students will perform local anesthesia on simulation models as well as performing local anesthesia injection techniques on each other. The course will also highlight the principles of asepsis in the dental clinic and the basic principles of oral surgery and exodontia. The course will also focus on basic armamentarium needed for the practice of oral surgery, postsurgical care and complications.

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology II is a pre-clinical course. In this course the students will learn about the principles of radiographic interpretation and formulating the radiographic differential diagnosis of the diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial region. It consists of both lectures, interactive sessions, presented over two terms.

Following completion of the course, the student is expected to have an understanding of:

  • Differentiation between normal and abnormal radiographic findings.
  • Utilizing the principles of interpretation in describing pathological lesions and formulating radiographic differential diagnosis.
  • Radiographic features of various pathological conditions affecting the oral and maxillofacial region
  • Applications of advanced imaging modalities for the diagnosis of diseases affecting temporomandibular joint, paranasal sinuses, maxillofacial trauma, benign and malignant tumors, developmental anomalies and systemic diseases.

The Orthodontics I (ORTH I) is essential for the dental student. This course has two primary objectives. The first objective is to fully comprehend the growth and development and its impact in orthodontics. The second objective of the course is to understand dental occlusion, orthodontic diagnosis and assessment tools.
Through a series of lectures and practical sessions, this course will provide the undergraduate students with the background of the normal occlusions, malocclusion, mechanics of bone growth and principles of prenatal and postnatal growth and development of cranial and dento-facial structures, development and characteristics of normal dentition and occlusion, etiology and diagnosis of malocclusion, management of the developing dentition and orthodontic assessment intra and extra orally and the treatment of occlusal discrepancies. In addition, the course will expose the students to various orthodontic records and it will prepare the students to analyze them and interpret the findings.

The D2 year-course in Pediatric Dentistry I is formed by 3 sections: didactic, pre-clinical practical and case based seminars. It introduces the dental student into the field of pediatric and adolescent dentistry. The course includes lectures on caries prevention, patient examination, data collection and diagnosis, treatment planning, rubber dam placement, restorations, pulp therapies, radiographs in pediatric dentistry, behavioral management techniques, growth and development of the dental arches, preventive and interceptive orthodontics, medications used in pediatric dentistry. A laboratory component includes preparations in primary teeth for amalgam and composite restorations and for stainless steel and strip crowns, in addition to a review and carving of the anatomy of primary teeth. Pulpotomy and pulpectomy practices are, as well, part of the lab sessions. Students apply sealants, fluoride varnish and rubber dams in a pre-clinic session, along with impression making practices, brief practices for space maintainers and mouthguards, and injection and radiographs and tooth whitening of the pediatric patient. The course ends with case-based seminars that discuss charting, treatment planning, and behavioral management scenarios.

The D2 course in Fixed Prosthodontics is the phase of dentistry that involves replacement of all or part of the coronal portion of a tooth or the replacement of one or more missing teeth by means of a non-removable (fixed) restoration. Fixed prosthodontics can range from restoring a single tooth to a complete rehabilitation of the dentition involving the restoration of all or most of the remaining teeth.
Principles involved in making both individual restorations and fixed partial dentures will be taught. The course includes different types of teeth preparations, the fabrication of temporary restorations using several techniques and materials, basic laboratory procedures involved in the fabrication of fixed prostheses as well as exposure to CAD-CAM restorations.

The OMPT 411 course covers most conditions in the oral cavity, focusing on the etiopathology and histology aspects using a traditional lecture format. Interactive sessions on select topics are included in the course to introduce and develop the process of generate a differential diagnosis. In addition, clinicopathological conferences will be part of the course. The assigned instructors will prepare case scenarios with clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic slides as needed. These cases will be designed efficiently to include the didactic material covered in the course.

Endodontics I is considered an introductory course in the D2 year where students will understand the basic knowledge related to Endodontics and learn how to perform an effective root canal treatment. In this course, D2 students will have the chance to practice on extracted human teeth as well as artificial acrylic teeth in order to be prepared to perform endodontic therapy on real patients.

Our Year 3 Courses list:

This course for D3 students is designed to prepare students to gain knowledge and skills in relation to dental research. The students in this course are required to choose a hypothesis and test it through a small pilot research project. The students are required to present their research proposal then submit it for evaluation. The term paper should include all elements of research proposal (Abstract, literature review, material and data collection methods, data management plan, work plan, budget, appendices, etc.).

The D3 Course in Oral Maxillofacial Surgey will cover topics in Oral Maxillofacial Surgey which go beyond the scope of the second year course.  It will cover the managmenet of common medical emergencies that could occur during dental interventions as well as the dental implications of commonly encountered medical conditions. The course will also discuss information about congenital and acuired abnormal conditions in the maxillofacial region as well as an introduction to the treatment of these conditions.

The D3 Comprehensive Dental Care I course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing simple clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

This course provides students with fundamental principles of infection control and ergonomics as applicable in a dental office setting.
In the current era where we confront exotic infections practically every few months, the dental practitioner, which includes each and every member of the dental team, has to be highly conversant and current with the principles and practice of infection control. Members of the dental team operate in a unique environment; the oral cavity contains both a higher microbial load and greater bacterial diversity than the rest of the human body. Saliva or plaque may harbour clinically significant viruses such as human immuno deficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis and herpes, in addition to bacterial pathogens that have been associated with infection. Moreover, the practice of dentistry requires the use of a range of sharp instruments and the generation of microbially contaminated aerosol and splatter, providing routes of transmission for these microorganisms. The small size of the typical surgery environment and the fact that patients undergoing treatment are often anxious increases the risk of incidents which may transmit infection.
The nature of the dental profession and the postures assumed by the dental surgeons during their professional work has a huge impact on the dental surgeon’s body and carries with it a high risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). To perform efficiently and effectively, they shall always like to attain a position that allows them to achieve optimum access, visibility, comfort, and control at all times. Good ergonomic design of the workplace is a basic requirement for facilitating the balanced musculoskeletal health that will enable longer, healthier career, enhance productivity, and minimize MSDs among dental surgeons. While treating the patients, they are concerned about patients’ comfort and pay little attention to their own health till they begin to experience discomfort in their body. With a little attention and creativity, dental surgeons can improve their comfort on the job during the course of their career
Most of the seesions in this course will be presented through the lecture format, Questions appearing in the exams will be based on e-material presented during the lectures and practical sessions. For further reading students are recommended to read the suggested refrence books mentioned in the course book.
Students will benefit themselves as well as society by practising standard infection protocol and ergonomics ensuring a long, uneventful, occupation related stress and pain free career.

The D3 Comprehensive Dental Care II course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing simple to advanced clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary information about the concepts of bioethics, dental ethics, professionalism and the legal and regulatory concepts in both dentistry and health in general.

The D3 year-course Translational case conference course has two primary objectives; the first objective is to translate basic sciences into clinical practice in order to deliver the recommended care to the right patient at the right time. The second objective of the course is the development of an understanding of how to identify clinical questions and gaps in the given care.

Lectures on selected physical, psychological, and medical disorders/diseases in special care patients presenting to the dental clinic. The course also includes dental management, patient confidentiality, informed consent and professional communication in a patient with special care needs.

The D3 Comprehensive Dental Care III course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing simple to advanced clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

The D3 year-course in Fixed Prosthodontics & Removable Prosthodontics provides a structured framework for the students to learn the scientific basis and the fundamental principles of Fixed Prosthodontics and complete and removable partial denture prosthodontics via lectures.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the major topics in operative dentistry and endodontics. Accordingly, it is constructed to enable the students to obtain a core of knowledge and develop the skills necessary to provide the utmost patient care. The course consists of a series of lectures. The general aim of the course is to provide a sound knowledge of various procedures and clinical concepts used in clinical operative dentistry and endodontics and conditions that may be experienced by dental patients. After studying dental pulp biology and pulpal diseases, the course provides a detailed examination of specific treatment modalities and principles of operative and endodontic therapies, which will be incorporated into the student’s clinical experience. It describes the advanced knowledge about pulp reaction to various operative procedures and materials, pulpal consideration during deep caries management, endodontic emergency, longitudinal root fracture, root resorption, management of traumatic dental injuries and pulpal interaction with other tissues during health and disease. The course also covers more advanced topics such as non-odontogenic toothache, regenerative endodontics, surgical endodontics, minimally invasive approaches, esthetic treatment modalities, restoration failure and its management, partial- and full-coverage indirect restorations and management of dentin hypersensitivity, non-carious lesions, crown fractures and other defects.

The D3 year-course in Periodontics and Dental Implants is designed to build upon the knowledge acquired during the first two years of the curriculum and to demonstrate and integrate this foundation with respect to patient management. Course instruction will occur in the introduction lecture. Course emphasis shall be upon surgical periodontal therapy and appropriate understanding of treatment modalities in a proper sequence.  Knowledge of the techniques, indications and desired outcomes of periodontal and implant surgical procedures shall be obtained.  In addition, students will receive knowledge and practical training (in the simulation Lab) in basic principles of periodontal surgical techniques, including regeneration, emerging technologies in periodontal tissue regeneration and implant therapy.

This course in Oral Medicine in both of its components the theory and seminar provides a review of variety of oral disease/disorders and TMJ disorders with regard to etiology, clinical presentations, differential diagnosis and addressing suitable parmaco-therapeutics.

The course is a combination of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics modules that aims to provide D3 students with a basic knowledge through on the subjects through series of lectures, case-based discussions, and clinical sessions. The pediatric dentistry component of the course is a continuation of the preclinical pediatric dentistry course in D2. This component provides the students with further knowledge and experience in the practice of dentistry for children and adolescents. The didactic part consists of lectures on the epidemiological and social aspects of dentistry for children, caries prevention, diet consultation, treatment planning, periodontal/soft tissues disease, dental and medical emergencies, treatment of trauma and dental disease, dental management of special health care need patients, pharmacological behavior management, dental anomalies, management of cleft lip and palate and speech difficulty, oral habits, child abuse and neglect and  advanced technology in the pediatric settings. On the other hand, the clinical part of the course composed of clinical sessions where students are expected to provide basic dental care to children and adolescents and participate in group discussions and learning exercises. The orthodontic component of the course provides the students with knowledge about the basic principles of cranio-facial growth and development, identify and classify different types of malocclusions, recognize the different treatment approaches whether preventive, interceptive, or comprehensive, and distinguish between simple problems that can be treated by general dentist and complex problems that need to be referred to a specialist. In addition, the course trains the students in taking and analyzing comprehensive orthodontic records to reach a diagnosis. Furthermore, the students in this course are introduced to various orthodontic appliances, become familiar with their applications, and develop the skills to fabricate and deliver appliances to treat simple cases.

Our Year 4 Courses list:

The D4 Advanced Comprehensive Dental Care I course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing more complex clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

The D4 Advanced Comprehensive Dental Care II course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing more complex clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

This course focuses on preparing the new graduate dentists for their dental career. The course discusses different management skills, career planning, financial planning, basic accounting, business planning, entrepreneurship, professional development, and overall wellbeing in dental practice.

The D4 Advanced Comprehensive Dental Care III course is designed to equip undergraduate dental students at KSAU-HS with knowledge, skills and attitude for the practice of comprehensive dental procedures in different specialties of dentistry: Oral Medicine, Periodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics. This course includes diagnosis, decision-making, treatment planning, and performing more complex clinical dental procedures on patients.  The course is designed to reinforce the student’s ability to focus on providing patient-centered care while meeting or exceeding minimum required experiences for clinical progression.

The D4 year-course Occlusion, TMDs and Orofacial Pain, OCLN 611 is designed to provide a chance for gaining better and advanced knowledge in the physiology of the masticatory system including occlusion of the natural dentition, concepts of occlusion and the maintenance of occlusion of natural dentition in a state of health, and background for the static and dynamic aspects of occlusion and its importance in clinical dentistry. Students are expected to develop the basic sound knowledge for gathering diagnostic information, developing clinical management of dental occlusion disturbances, orofacial pain, and temporomandibular joint dysfunctions.

The D4 year-course translational case conference course includes interactive learning sessions. The course is based on small group clinical presentation of clinical cases or scenarios related to different disciplines in dentistry, aiming to stimulate interactive discussions and critical evaluations of case-based management. The learning sessions are designed to explore student’s basic dental and relevant medical knowledge and clinical assessment skills through in-depth interactive discussions with specialists and other students.

This course is designed to prepare students to continue with the gained knowledge and skills from Research project I (RESP 511) course in relation to dental research. The students in this course are required to continue his research project from last semester and complete all the component of an observational study. The students are expected to present their project and to write term paper then submit it for evaluation. The term paper should include all elements of research paper (Abstract, literature review, material and methods, results, discussion and conclusion).

This course provides current knowledge in oral epidemiology and prevention, which includes methodological consideration, measurement of dental caries, periodontal disease as well as other dental diseases and conditions. In addition it includes information on prevention and control of dental caries, periodontal disease, dental trauma, malocclusion and oral mucosal lesions. An integral part of this course takes students outside of the School’s clinics and campus to connect with diverse segments of the public and come to understand the impact of social, cultural, and economic forces on oral health care. These academically based service-learning programs provide students with the framework to complete community-based activities as an essential, required component of academic course work.

This course is a combined pediatric dentistry and orthodontic clinical course focused on providing students with the fundamental skills of managing comprehensive oral care in pediatric patients including assessment and planning of orthodontic treatment needs. The course focuses on improving the clinical skills of students when dealing with pediatric patients and their unique needs.